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The State of Federal and State Accountability Systems That Support P-12 and Postsecondary Transition Services for English Learners with Disabilities

Do They Exist and What Is the Need?
  • Carlette C. Bethea
  • Zollie Stevenson Jr.
Chapter
  • 303 Downloads
Part of the Studies in Inclusive Education book series (STUIE)

Abstract

The number of English Language Learners (ELLs) enrolled in P-16 school entities and as college undergraduates in the United States has increased significantly from the 2000 to 2010 U.S. Census increasing to 14% of the public-school population (from 3.7 million to 4.7 million) and 14% of the college student population (The Condition of Education, 2012). As the number of ELLs increases, the number of ELLs identified as possessing a disability has also increased to slightly over 18% of the public school aged population in 2013–2014 (U.S. Department of Education, 2015).

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carlette C. Bethea
    • 1
  • Zollie Stevenson Jr.
    • 2
  1. 1.Educational Leadership & Policy StudiesHoward UniversityUSA
  2. 2.Philander Smith CollegeUSA

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