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Increasing Cultural Responsiveness

Improving Transition Outcomes for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students
  • Renee L. Garraway
  • Consuela Robinson
Chapter
  • 310 Downloads
Part of the Studies in Inclusive Education book series (STUIE)

Abstract

After a long day of scheduled Individual Education Program (IEP) meetings with several cancellations and no-shows, we broke for lunch and debriefed with our colleagues about some of our neediest students. Most of the parents indicated that they forgot about the meeting; had no transportation; or had to work.

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Renee L. Garraway
    • 1
  • Consuela Robinson
    • 2
  1. 1.Educational LeadershipBowie State UniversityUSA
  2. 2.Prince George’s County Public SchoolsUSA

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