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Co-Creating the Joy of Writing

Creative Analytical Writing Practices
  • Charlotte Wegener
Chapter
  • 457 Downloads
Part of the Creative Education Book Series book series (CREA)

Abstract

“I write in order to learn something that I did not know before I wrote it”, Laurel Richardson (1994/2003, p. 501) aptly noted, and this statement also applies to the ideas presented in this chapter. The chapter suggests a way to think about practice and teach creative, co-created writing practices that makes writing a key to learning and identity building for students. In my teaching and supervision of students, I wish for writing to become a way of thinking, learning and being in the world.

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charlotte Wegener
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Communication and PsychologyAalborg UniversityDenmark

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