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Pedagogies of Gender in a Disney Mash-Up

Princesses, Queens, Beasts, Pirates, Lost Boys, and Witches
  • Nancy Taber
Chapter
Part of the Transgressions: Cultural Studies and Education book series (TRANS, volume 95)

Abstract

I have always loved fairy tales due to their magical plots and fantastical settings. I grew up watching these tales, as adapted into Disney movies and television programs, continuing to enjoy them into adulthood. Over the years, I have come to prefer fairy tale reimaginings, such as those that turn the antagonist into the protagonist (i.e., Gregory Maguire’s Wicked novel, 2007) and those told from a feminist pespective (i.e., anthologies compiled by Zipes, 1989, and Walker, 1996).

Keywords

Popular Culture Fairy Tale Romantic Love Gender Discourse True Love 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nancy Taber
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of EducationBrock UniversityCanada

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