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Doctor Who Fandom, Critical Engagement, and Transmedia Storytelling

The Public Pedagogy of the Doctor
  • Robin Redmon Wright
  • Gary L. Wright
Chapter
Part of the Transgressions: Cultural Studies and Education book series (TRANS, volume 95)

Abstract

As the opening quotation indicates, many Doctor Who fans care about improving lives and curing social ills. Meisner (2011) asserts that the Doctor is “an activist” who is “an example to concerned citizens everywhere” (p. 7). While scholars differ in their interpretations of the show’s texts, most agree that many episodes contain overt anti-totalitarian storylines, progressive social messages, and educative political parallels.

Keywords

Textual Analysis Popular Culture Adult Educator Science Fiction Critical Engagement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robin Redmon Wright
    • 1
  • Gary L. Wright
    • 2
  1. 1.College of EducationPenn State UniversityHarrisburg
  2. 2.School of Science, Engineering and TechnologyPenn State UniversityHarrisburg

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