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My Struggle for Pedagogy

  • Jennifer M. Gore
Chapter
Part of the Leaders in Educational Studies book series (LES)

Abstract

It was Christmas Day, 2002. I know this because the date is written on the inside cover of the book Mum’s sister, Sally, handed me. I recall her apologising in advance for what she described as a rather odd gift. Intrigued, I tentatively uncovered the title Siblings: Brothers and sisters of children with special needs (Strohm, 2002) and wondered if I’d ever read it.

Keywords

Teacher Education Physical Education Student Teacher Kindergarten Teacher Feminist Pedagogy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Key Readings

  1. Bernstein, B. (1990). Class, codes, and control: The structuring of pedagogic discourse (vol. 4). London, UK: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Ellsworth, E. (1989). Why doesn’t this feel empowering? Working through the repressive myths of critical pedagogy. Harvard Educational Review, 59(3), 297–324.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Foucault, M. (1980). Body/power. In C. Gordon (Ed.), Power/knowledge: Selected interviews and other writings 1972–1977 by Michel Foucault (pp. 52–62). New York, NY: Pantheon Books.Google Scholar

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jennifer M. Gore
    • 1
  1. 1.The University of NewcastleAustralia

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