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A Compound Criticality

  • Noah De Lissovoy
Chapter
  • 518 Downloads
Part of the Leaders in Educational Studies book series (LES)

Abstract

I sometimes feel as though I have lived several different lives, and I am not completely convinced that we can make sense of our mature identities on the basis of our past, or pasts. However, from a different perspective there are certainly crucial connections, which I will risk pursuing here—and it may be that the disjunctions reveal something as well.

Keywords

Critical Consciousness Critical Pedagogy Hide Curriculum Critical Race Theory Western Modernity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Key Readings

  1. Fanon, F. (1963). The wretched of the earth.Google Scholar
  2. Freire, P. (1970/1996). Pedagogy of the oppressed.Google Scholar
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References

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Noah De Lissovoy
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Texas at AustinAustin

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