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Just What the Hell is a Neo-Marxist Anyway?

A Political and Intellectual Biography
  • Wayne Au
Chapter
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Part of the Leaders in Educational Studies book series (LES)

Abstract

When asked to write my intellectual biography and how and why I came to enter the field of critical pedagogy (to the extent it can be called a “field,” see, Apple & Au, 2015, for further discussion), a large part of me wants to give the short answer: For as long as I can remember, my dad has been a communist. Now that answer is simplistic and incomplete, but it does speak to some things that were foundational in my development as a child and into my adult life.

Keywords

World Trade Organization Intellectual Development Charter School Critical Education Historical Materialism 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wayne Au
    • 1
  1. 1.University of WashingtonBothell

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