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The Potential of Poetic Possibility

A Currere of Sociopolitical Awakenings
  • Lisa Y. Wiliam-White
Chapter
  • 519 Downloads
Part of the Leaders in Educational Studies book series (LES)

Abstract

This poetic, autobiographic performance piece frames the intersection of the personal and the political for a scholar-practitioner, one who is a life-longer learner and voracious reader. The utilization and examination of critical pedagogy/ies through poetic aesthetics animates the author’s teaching, research, and pursuit of personal transformation.

Keywords

Critical Pedagogy Critical Race Theory Deadly Force Personal Transformation Black History 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Key Works Selected

  1. Bell D (1992) Faces at the bottom of the well: The permanence of racism. Basic Books, New York, NYGoogle Scholar
  2. Crenshaw K, Gotanda N, Peller G, Homas K (eds) (1995) Critical race theory: The key writings that formed the movement. The New Press, New York, NYGoogle Scholar
  3. Freire P (1970) Pedagogy of the oppressed. Continuum, New York, NYGoogle Scholar
  4. Richardson L (2001b) Getting personal: Writing-stories. International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education 14:33–38CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Shor I, Paulo F (1987) A pedagogy for liberation: Dialogues on transforming education. Bergin and Garvey, South Hadley, MAGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lisa Y. Wiliam-White
    • 1
  1. 1.Sacramento State UniversityCalifornia

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