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Towards Rebellious Research

Pages from the Sketchbook of a Working Class Academic
  • Juha Suoranta
Chapter
Part of the Leaders in Educational Studies book series (LES)

Abstract

Only slowly did I understand that if some of my most banal reactions were often misinterpreted, it was often because the manner – tone, voice, gestures, facial expressions, etc. – in which I sometimes manifested them, a mixture of aggressive shyness and a growling, even furious, bluntness, might be taken at face value, in other words, in a sense too seriously, and that it contrasted so much with the distant assurance of well-born Parisians that it always threatened to give the appearance of uncontrolled, querulous violence to reflex and sometimes purely ritual transgressions of the conventions and commonplaces of academic or intellectual routine. (Bourdieu, 2008, p. 89)

Keywords

Critical Pedagogy Public Sociology Invisible College Plain Sight Nordic Welfare State 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Juha Suoranta
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Social Sciences and HumanitiesUniversity of TampereFinland

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