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From Practice to Theory & from Theory to Praxis

A Journey with Paulo Freire
  • Ana L. Cruz
Chapter
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Part of the Leaders in Educational Studies book series (LES)

Abstract

The journey started when I was “initiated” into critical pedagogy through Pedagogy of the Oppressed, Paulo Freire’s major work (Freire, 1970). This initiation happened in Manaus, in the heart of Amazonia, during a high school sociology class where the teacher assigned this work as required reading. Reading Pedagogy of the Oppressed resonated with me immediately and laid a foundation for which I returned when I attended university as a graduate student in the field of education.

Keywords

Future Teacher Critical Consciousness Critical Pedagogy Musical Activity Deaf Community 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Key Works by Paulo Freire

  1. Pedagogy of the oppressed. New York, NY: Continuum.Google Scholar
  2. (1974). Education for critical consciousness. New York, NY: Continuum.Google Scholar
  3. (1994). Pedagogy of hope: Reliving pedagogy of the oppressed. New York, NY: Continuum.Google Scholar
  4. (1998). Pedagogy of freedom: Ethics, democracy and civic courage. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.Google Scholar
  5. (1998). Teachers as cultural workers: Letters to those who dare teach. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.Google Scholar

Not Yet Translated into English

  1. (1980). Conscientização: Teoria e práctica da libertação: Uma introdução ao pensamento de Paulo Freire. São Paulo, SP: Moraes.Google Scholar
  2. (1985). Essa escola chamada vida. São Paulo, SP: Ática. [co-authored with Betto, F.]Google Scholar

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  3. Cruz, A. L. (1997a). Critical thinking in music: Insights from teaching music to a deaf teenager. Canadian Music Educator, 38(2), 35–38.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ana L. Cruz
    • 1
  1. 1.St. Louis Community College at MeramecMeramec

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