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Diversions and Shortcuts in the Law of International Criminal Procedure

  • Koen Vriend
Chapter
Part of the International Criminal Justice Series book series (ICJS, volume 8)

Abstract

In this chapter diversions and shortcuts in international criminal proceedings are discussed. Two diversions are identified in the proceedings before the ICTY, ICTR, and ICC: the guilty plea and the admission of guilt. Four shortcuts to proof are discerned in international criminal proceedings: agreed facts, judicial notice of facts of common knowledge, judicial notice of adjudicated facts and documentary evidence, and appeal proceedings.

Keywords

Diversions Shortcuts Guilty plea Admission of guilt Agreed facts Judicial notice Facts of common knowledge Adjudicated facts Appeal proceedings ICTY ICTR ICC 

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Copyright information

© T.M.C. Asser Press and the author 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Law Faculty/Criminal LawUniversity of AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands

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