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Overworked and Stressed Teachers Under the Market Economy

Case Study in Northwest China
Chapter
Part of the Spotlight on China book series (SPOT)

Abstract

This chapter is based on a case study conducted in Xisheng (pseudonym promised to the participants for anonymity purposes) in Northwest China to explore teachers’ perspectives on teaching under the market economy system. The original plan was to study local indigenous teachers, but that was not possible due to political sensitivity of the region at the time of data collection.

Keywords

Market Economy Language Policy Rural School Bilingual Education Indigenous Language 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.English DepartmentIowa State UniversityIowa
  2. 2.School of EducationUniversity of CincinnatiU.S.

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