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What Does Innovation Mean and Why Does it Matter?

Innovation in Chinese Higher Education in a Global Era
Chapter
Part of the Spotlight on China book series (SPOT)

Abstract

Carolyn Mooney’s question, posed in a recent issue of The Chronicle of Higher Education (2014), aptly captures our motivation for writing this chapter. Why has “innovation” become a global buzzword in the discourse of educational philanthropists, policy makers, and pundits? What explains the saliency of innovation as the (disruptive or salutatory) silver bullet that should direct “the future of college” (Wood, 2014)? When educators and reformers advocate for innovation at both the institutional and individual level, to what social, economic, and political conditions are they responding? And what and whose purposes do their stated desires to nurture innovation serve? This chapter explores these questions primarily from the perspective of how innovation is employed in the national policies, academic discourses, and institutional contexts of higher education in China.

Keywords

High Education Mission Statement Extracurricular Activity Chinese Literature Talent Development 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Educational Policy StudiesIndiana UniversityUS
  2. 2.Centre for East Asian and Pacific StudiesUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignChicago

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