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Private Tutoring Cum Boarding Agencies and the Controlled Decentralization of China’s Education System

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Part of the Spotlight on China book series (SPOT)

Abstract

As part of minban education, private tutoring agencies have emerged and consolidated in tandem with the development of the market economy in China. Their introduction has been viewed as a product of the paradigms of controlled decentralization and privatization of the Chinese education system.

Keywords

Local Government Central Government Migrant Worker Migrant Child Private Tutoring 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Sense Publishers 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of SociologyChina Women’s UniversityChina
  2. 2.Department of Applied Social SciencesCity University of Hong KongHong Kong

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