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Negotiating Healthcare Relationships through Communication

  • Jill Hummell
  • Alison Gates
Part of the Practice, Education, Work and Society book series (PEWS)

Abstract

Healthcare relationships are complex and multidimensional. Managing and negotiating such complexity and diversity presents challenges for all concerned. Meanwhile, positive health outcomes are contingent on the successful management of diverse healthcare relationships. In this chapter we draw on a social-ecological model of health promotion to scaffold the complexity of relationships within the healthcare context and then focus on communication as a critical way to link dimensions of those healthcare relationships at system and individual levels.

Keywords

Health Professional Effective Communication Individual Client Positive Health Outcome Healthcare Context 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jill Hummell
    • 1
  • Alison Gates
    • 2
  1. 1.Brain Injury Rehabilitation ServiceWestmead HospitalAustralia
  2. 2.The Education For Practice InstituteCharles Sturt UniversityAustralia

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