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Abstract

Classical test theory (CTT) is the foundational theory of measurement of mental abilities. At its core, CTT describes the relationship between observed composite scores on a test and a presumed but unobserved “true” score for an examinee. CTT is called “classical” because it is thought to be the first operational use of mathematics to characterize this relationship (cf. Gullicksen, 1950).

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© Sense Publishers 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ze Wang
  • Steven J. Osterlind

There are no affiliations available

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