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Explicit Literacy Instruction Embedded in Middle School Science Classrooms

A Community-based Professional Development Project to Enhance Scientific Literacy
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Abstract

The Explicit Literacy Instruction Embedded in Middle School Science Classrooms project was initiated in the spring of 2005 at the request of a small group of teachers from two middle schools in a Victoria, British Columbia (BC), school district that had French immersion and English programs of instruction in Grades 6, 7, and 8. A third middle school joined the project later. Part of the motivation was that the school district was implementing the new K–7 and Grade 8 provincial science curricula (BC Ministry of Education [MoE], 2005, 2006) and the schools’ had recently selected and purchased textbooks.

Keywords

Professional Development Middle School School District Pedagogical Content Knowledge British Columbia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Curriculum and InstructionUniversity of VictoriaVictoriaCanada
  2. 2.Department of Curriculum and InstructionUniversity of VictoriaVictoriaCanada

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