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Diplostomes

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Abstract

Human infections are known in 2 diplostome (Diplostomidae) species, namely, Neodiplostomum seoulense and Fibricola cratera. Human infections with N. seoulense occur rarely in Korea (around 30 cases reported). The patients have consumed undercooked terrestrial snakes, a paratenic host. Its geographical distribution extends only from Korea to China. Natural human infections with F. cratera are unknown and only 1 experimental human infection was reported in USA. Its geographical distribution is limited to USA and Canada.

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© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Tropical Medicine and ParasitologySeoul National University College of MedicineSeoulSouth Korea
  2. 2.Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Korea Association of Health PromotionSeoulSouth Korea

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