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Echinostomes

Chapter

Abstract

Among the species of the Echinostomatidae, total 23 (8 genera) are classified as human-infecting species; Echinostoma revolutum, Echinostoma cinetorchis, Echinostoma lindoense, Echinostoma paraensei, Echinostoma ilocanum, Echinostoma macrorchis, Echinostoma angustitestis, Echinostoma aegyptiacum, Isthmiophora hortensis, Isthmiophora melis, Echinochasmus japonicus, Echinochasmus perfoliatus, Echinochasmus liliputanus, Echinochasmus fujianensis, Echinochasmus jiufoensis, Echinochasmus caninus, Acanthoparyphium tyosenense, Artyfechinostomum malayanum, Artyfechinostomum sufrartyfex, Artyfechinostomum oraoni, Echinoparyphium recurvatum, Himasthla muehlensi, and Hypoderaeum conoideum. These zoonotic echinostomes are distributed mainly in Southeast Asia, including the Far East, and Europe. They are contracted to humans by ingesting raw or improperly cooked molluscs or fish. In view of the wide geographical distribution and the large number of infected people around the world, Echinostoma, Isthmiophora, and Echinochasmus are the 3 major genera and most highlighted in this review book. Species of the other 5 human-infecting genera are also briefly described. Echinostomes without human infections are given only by their names with literature background as potentially zoonotic species.

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© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Tropical Medicine and ParasitologySeoul National University College of MedicineSeoulSouth Korea
  2. 2.Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Korea Association of Health PromotionSeoulSouth Korea

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