Aligning Perspectives and Promoting Sustainability

  • Aditya Jain
  • Stavroula Leka
  • Gerard I. J. M. Zwetsloot
Chapter
Part of the Aligning Perspectives on Health, Safety and Well-Being book series (AHSW)

Abstract

The final chapter of this book will revisit the evidence, perspectives and approaches presented in the previous chapters and draw out key messages for the future. It will address existing needs both in policy and practice in order to align perspectives and address health, safety and well-being (HSW) in its totality and in a multi and interdisciplinary manner. The chapter will discuss how the complementarity and synergies among different perspectives can be enhanced in research and practice. It will also highlight how aligning perspectives and mainstreaming HSW can be achieved in policy making and at the organizational context to promote sustainability. Examples of key good practice holistic models will be presented to this end. Finally, important actions needed by policy makers, managers, workers, HSW professionals/practitioners and researchers will be highlighted and key directions for the future in terms of research and practice will be identified.

Keywords

Health, safety and well-being Aligning perspectives Sustainability Mainstreaming Policy Practice 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aditya Jain
    • 1
  • Stavroula Leka
    • 2
  • Gerard I. J. M. Zwetsloot
    • 3
    • 2
  1. 1.Nottingham University Business School and Centre for Organizational Health and DevelopmentUniversity of NottinghamNottinghamUK
  2. 2.Centre for Organizational Health and DevelopmentUniversity of NottinghamNottinghamUK
  3. 3.Gerard Zwetsloot Research & ConsultancyAmsterdamThe Netherlands

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