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“Redefining” Secularism? Philosophical Perspectives on Secularism, Post-Secularism and the Contemporary Relation Between Politics and Religion

  • C. Allen Speight
Chapter
Part of the Boston Studies in Philosophy, Religion and Public Life book series (BSPR, volume 6)

Abstract

Few terms in the traditional theologico-political lexicon have been more at issue in the last decade or so than the notion of secularism. A steady stream of books, conferences and online blogs has brought the interdisciplinary work of philosophers, scholars of religion and social scientists to bear on the examination of assumptions about what secularism is and what role it plays within modern societies. While much has been achieved within this growing literature in clarifying the notion of secularism (and particularly its relation to the notions of secularization and secularity), there is still a great deal of territory that remains philosophically important to explore, even as contemporary events from terrorist strikes to various iterations of the “scarf affair” provoke new questions.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PhilosophyBoston UniversityBostonUSA

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