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Toward Individualistic Cooperative Play: A Systematic Analysis of Mobile Social Games in Japan

  • Akiko ShibuyaEmail author
  • Mizuha Teramoto
  • Akiyo Shoun
Chapter
Part of the Mobile Communication in Asia: Local Insights, Global Implications book series (MCALIGI)

Abstract

This study examines the social features of the 31 most popular games in Japan’s rapidly expanding mobile social game market, as ranked through a survey of 2660 teenagers and young adults in November 2013. Results showed that all 31 games had at least one of the three social features, namely, connections to social networking services (SNSs), competition, and cooperation. In the games, SNS connections were present in 84 % of games, competition in 87 % of games, cooperation in 94 %. Among the cooperative features, individualistic cooperative play was more prevalent than team play.

Keywords

Smartphones Social features Social games Systematic analysis Mobile device 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was funded by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 25380857. We thank eleven coders, who played and analyzed social games during spring break, for their patience, efforts, and suggestions.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of LettersSoka UniversityTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Doctoral Program in Human Developmental Sciences, Graduate School of Humanities and SciencesOchanomizu UniversityTokyoJapan

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