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The Well-Being of Working Women in Times of Economic Crisis and Recovery: Insights from the Great Recession

  • Janice PetersonEmail author
Part of the International Handbooks of Quality-of-Life book series (IHQL)

Abstract

The Great Recession drew new attention to the importance of gender in the U.S. economy. Popular analyses of the recession’s impacts emphasized the higher rates of job loss among men than women, leading some to rename the Great Recession the “Great Mancession.” With the onset of a weak recovery the “Mancession” gave way to a “Mancovery,” where unemployment rates increased for women as they declined for men. Recently, women’s employment has increased, but in types of work that give rise to questions of job quality and the future economic prospects of women workers. This chapter provides a broad overview of the impacts of the Great Recession on the well-being of women workers in the United States, blending discussions of descriptive statistics with influential interpretative narratives of the recession’s impacts. Insights from emerging feminist economic analyses of the Great Recession and the well-being of women workers provide a framework for examining the changing positions of women in the recovery and developing questions for future research.

Keywords

Austerity Breadwinners Feminist economics Great Recession Industry/occupational segmentation Labor force participation Mancession Mancovery Unemployment rate 

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© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of EconomicsCalifornia State UniversityFresnoUSA

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