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Towards Mesocosmic Rituals in the Vedas

  • Lenart Škof
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Part of the Sophia Studies in Cross-cultural Philosophy of Traditions and Cultures book series (SCPT, volume 10)

Abstract

In this chapter the ancient Vedic world is presented through a critical intercultural approach. Through a reading of the Indian philosopher J. L. Mehta it is our aim to open a path toward the primary cosmic gesture, as proposed in a comparative reading of the Upaniṣads with Heidegger. This happens in the close vicinity of the poetic thought of the Upaniṣads (bráhman and akṣara) and Heidegger. In order to approach this origin, it is first necessary to revitalise the ancient Upaniṣadic thinking as well as the comparative thinking as proposed by Mehta and Heidegger himself.

Keywords

J.L. Mehta Heidegger Intercultural philosophy Upaniṣads 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lenart Škof
    • 1
  1. 1.Science and Research CentreUniversity of PrimorskaKoperSlovenia

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