Ethical Problems of Interpretation in Educational Research

Chapter
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE)

Abstract

Ethics address questions of the “good” and how benefits and disadvantages accrued in society are earned and distributed. Research ethics, then, concern how the “good” translates into research practice. The chapter addresses ethics in the conduct of research and what will happen to participants, and ethics in interpretation, or what happens to data after they are collected, how and what kind of interpretations researchers assign to research results, and what consequences those interpretations have for human beings. Ethical concerns are divided into procedural or formal matters and everyday or ordinary (Lambek 2010) matters, and the differences among them are discussed. Also discussed are whether epistemological differences mandate different approaches to ethics, what interpretation really means and how it has ethical valence, and what standard concerns about ethics mean in the twenty-first century, as they are redefined for research in non-Western cultural settings and on groups, rather than individuals.

Keywords

School District Research Participant School Reform Power Asymmetry Belmont Report 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Education, University of Colorado-BoulderBoulderUSA

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