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Living Conditions and Perceived Quality of Life Among Indigenous Peoples in the Arctic

  • Birger PoppelEmail author
Chapter
Part of the International Handbooks of Quality-of-Life book series (IHQL)

Abstract

Rapid economic, social, political and cultural changes have characterized societal and human development in the circumpolar north since World War II. The development includes new government structures, devolution of power from southern capitals to northern communities, and the development of self-governing entities. This development has been accelerated by growing self-awareness of indigenous and other Arctic residents. The documentation of large oil, gas and mineral deposits has increased the economic interests in the Arctic, and the indisputable evidence of global warming has resulted in an increased focus on human development, on livelihoods, living conditions, subjective wellbeing and quality of life in Arctic societies.

This chapter is based on data and research results from almost 8,000 personal interviews of the Survey of Living Conditions in the Arctic (SLiCA). SLiCA was conducted among Inuit, Saami and indigenous peoples of Chukotka and the Kola Peninsula in the period 2001–2008. SLiCA findings document similarities, common backgrounds and huge differences in living conditions, subjective wellbeing and quality of life among indigenous peoples of the Arctic.

Keywords

Living conditions Subjective wellbeing Quality of life Arctic SLiCA Indigenous peoples 

Notes

Acknowledgements

SLiCA was developed in partnership between the indigenous peoples’ organisations: Inuit Circumpolar Conference, ICC; Russian Association of Indigenous Peoples of the North, RAIPON; Saami Council as well as local and regional indigenous steering committees, advisory and management boards, focus groups and the SLiCA international research team. Principal investigators (2014): Birger Poppel, Cathrine Turcotte, Jack Kruse, Larissa Abryutina, Hugh Beach, Ann Raghild Broderstad, Gerard Duhaime. Other team members (2014): Bent-Martin Eliassen, Christian Jensen, Marg Kruse, Miillaaraq Lennert, Maritha Melhus, MarieKathrine Poppel, Rasmus Ole Rasmussen, Ed Ward (for a more complete list see ‘Acknowledgements’ in Poppel et al. 2007).

The data, tables and graphs in this chapter all originate from the SLiCA database constructed and developed by Jack and Marg Kruse.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Social Sciences, IlisimatusarfikUniversity of GreenlandNuukGreenland

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