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Status, Power and Felicity

  • Theodore D. KemperEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Handbooks of Sociology and Social Research book series (HSSR)

Abstract

Status and power are the main concepts of a general theory of social relations in which a large class of emotions results from outcomes of social interaction as described in status and power terms. Here the theory is elaborated to account for feelings of felicity or happiness in each of four possible relational outcomes: (1) Obtaining status; (2) According status to another; (3) Gaining power; and (4) Other’s power declining. Each of these relational outcomes provides a basis for feelings of happiness. Status-power theory also affords an understanding of meaningfulness, a frequently sought goal for life undertakings.

Keywords

Status Power Emotions Happiness Meaningfulness 

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© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.St. John’s UniversityQueensUSA

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