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Social Movements and Emotions

  • James M. JasperEmail author
  • Lynn Owens
Chapter
Part of the Handbooks of Sociology and Social Research book series (HSSR)

Abstract

Recent research has discovered that emotions animate a number of interactions within social movements and between protestors and other strategic players: in recruiting new participants, maintaining the enthusiasm of existing ones, assessing external threats and opportunities, engaging and surviving conflict, and more. In addition to examining the emotional dynamics of a series of these strategic interactions, we also look at the role that place plays in protest emotions and at the impact that social movements can have and have had on the triggers and displays of emotions.

Keywords

Protest Social movements Emotions Rituals Identity Movement outcomes 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Graduate Center, CUNYNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Middlebury CollegeMiddleburyUSA

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