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From Evolving Capacities to Evolving Capabilities: Contextualizing Children’s Rights

  • Manfred LiebelEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Children’s Well-Being: Indicators and Research book series (CHIR, volume 8)

Abstract

Children are entitled to human rights regardless of their capacities. However, it is to be questioned what conditions have to be in place to enable children to make use of their rights, be it claiming them from society or exercising them themselves. Up to now, the concept of ‘evolving capacities’ which is codified in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) was applied for this purpose. This concept however is understood in different ways: as a precondition for the use of rights or as a result of a learning process that (also) arises from the knowledge about and the use of rights. In contrast to this, the present chapter argues for a contextualized concept of children’s rights which connects the view of subjective capacities with a view to the social prerequisites for children dealing with their rights wilfully. To this end, this chapter depicts to what extent the concept of capabilities elaborated in different versions of the Capability Approach can be used and refined with a look at children (in terms of ‘evolving capabilities’). In this context, special attention will be given to theoretical aspects of social justice and particularly to children’s sense of justice, especially those who are living in socially disadvantaged situations.

Keywords

Capability Approach Street Child Process Aspect Internal Capability Subjective Capacity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Fachbereich Erziehungswissenschaft und PsychologieFreie Universität BerlinBerlinGermany

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