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Religious Education in Japanese ‘Mission Schools’: A Case Study of Sacred Heart Schools in Japan

  • Nozomi Miura rscjEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

The number of “Christians” has never been large in Japan (less than 1 % of the total population); however, Christianity, in spite of its being a minority religious tradition, has been a uniquely influential element in the Japanese educational system, particularly in women’s education. Various data evince that Christian educational institutions, along with their value system, are well received in Japan. Tracing the history of the Sacred Heart education in Japan in the light of the history of Japanese education, the article delineates an example of Catholic “mission schools” in Japan: the schools and the colleges of the Sacred Heart, focusing on the religious education in these educational institutions.

Keywords

The Sacred Heart Education Catholic education Religion classes Curriculum of the religion classes Prayer Reflection Voluntary activities Single-sex education Mission schools 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PhilosophyUniversity of the Sacred HeartTokyoJapan

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