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So Who Has the Values? Challenges for Faith-Based Schools in an Era of Values Pedagogy

  • Terence LovatEmail author
  • Neville Clement
Chapter

Abstract

The past decade has seen a significant increase in emphasis on values pedagogy, variously titled values education, character education and moral education, across the world, including heavily in governmental and broadly non faith-based educational contexts. The potential of such pedagogy to influence educational outcomes, ranging from socio-emotional to academic outcomes, has been demonstrated in ways that supersede most historical evidence. Granted that most of the earlier evidence about the effects of values pedagogy has come from faith-based contexts, the chapter explores the challenges for faith-based schools in an era that sees much of its traditional distinctive pedagogy being implemented and arguably perfected more widely outside such contexts.

Keywords

Achievement Ambience Competence Diligence Faith based Neurosciences Outcomes Performance Success Values Values education Values pedagogy Wellbeing 

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© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Education and ArtsThe University of NewcastleNewcastleAustralia

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