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The Impact of Faith-Based Schools on Lives and on Society: Policy Implications

  • Charles L. GlennEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

A large-scale study of the effects of different types of schooling upon the subsequent attitudes and behaviors of adults, holding constant background factors, found that those who had attended Catholic and Evangelical schools differed in significant ways, not only from those who attended public schools, but also from each other. This chapter offers a possible historical explanation of these differences, and some very preliminary suggestions about what we might expect to find as the effects of attendance at Islamic schools in the American context. The second part of the chapter explores implications for public policy in North America and Western Europe, where policy-makers are struggling with the role of educational systems in turning the children of Muslim immigrants into citizens of the host societies. One conclusion is that there is no reason for panic about the desire of many Muslim parents to provide a distinctive schooling for their children; another is that wise public policy responses can increase the beneficent effect of such schooling.

Keywords

Catholic schools Civic values Evangelical schools Germany Ireland Islamic schools Neutrality Outcomes Public Secularist United Kingdom 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Education Leadership and PolicyBoston UniversityBostonUSA

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