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Implications of Population Change for Health, Health Care, and Public Assistance Programs in the United States

Chapter

Abstract

Health and health care are markedly impacted by demographic factors including rates of population growth, aging and racial/ethnic diversification. The number of incidences of disease/disorders will increase by 48.6%, although the population is projected to increase by only 36.1% from 2010 to 2060. The nonHispanic White population is projected to show a 3.7% increase in the number of health incidences from 2010 to 2060, nonHispanic Black population increasing by 77.3%, the Hispanic population by 239.3 and nonHispanic Asians and Others by 193.3%. Projections indicate future shortages in the number of health care personnel with the number of personnel increasing by 7.4% while disease incidences increase by 48.6%. From 2010 to 2060 physician contacts are projected to increase by 54.1%, hospital days by 76.0%, physician costs by 56.8%, and hospital costs by 55.1% (in 2010 constant dollars). The reduced financial resources projected for the population and the aging of the population will increase Medicaid enrollment by 58.5% and Medicare enrollment by 102.7%. Population aging will increase Medicare costs to one trillion dollars per year, persons in nursing homes to 3.8 million and nursing home costs to $12.1 billion per month by 2060. Clearly understanding the characteristics of the population of the United States is essential to understanding its future health care requirements and costs.

Keywords

Nursing Home Resident Minority Population Health Care Personnel Projection Period Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Hobby Center & Department of SociologyRice UniversityHoustonUSA
  2. 2.Hobby Ctr. for the Study of TexasRice UniversityHoustonUSA
  3. 3.University of Texas at San AntonioSan AntonioUSA
  4. 4.AlexandriaUSA
  5. 5.Verizon WirelessHilliardUSA

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