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Effects of Population Change on the Size and Characteristics of the Labor Force of the United States

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Abstract

The United States labor force is projected to increase from 155.7 million in 2010 to 196.2 million in 2060, with the most rapid growth being in the Hispanic (153.6%) and nonHispanic Asian and Other labor forces (132.2%). The labor force is projected to become more diverse from 2010 to 2060 from 66.1 to 43.4% nonHispanic White, 11.4 to 12.5% nonHispanic Black, 15.2 to 30.6% Hispanic and from 7.3 to 13.5% nonHispanic Asian and Other. Because of lower levels of education for Hispanic and nonHispanic Black populations, without improvements in the level of education for such groups, the percentage of the labor force with higher levels of education and in managerial and professional positions will decrease resulting in decline in overall income levels (in 2010 constant dollars) from 2010 to 2060. If the education and workforce opportunities for nonHispanic Black and Hispanic workers are not improved future returns to labor in the United States will decrease.

Keywords

Labor Force Minority Population Hispanic Population Labor Force Participation Rate Lower Income Level 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Hobby Center & Department of SociologyRice UniversityHoustonUSA
  2. 2.Hobby Ctr. for the Study of TexasRice UniversityHoustonUSA
  3. 3.University of Texas at San AntonioSan AntonioUSA
  4. 4.AlexandriaUSA
  5. 5.Verizon WirelessHilliardUSA

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