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Methods to Establish Subtypes of Developmental Dyslexia

  • Nathalie Genard
  • Philippe Mousty
  • Alain Content
  • Jesus Alegria
  • Jacqueline Leybaert
  • José Morais
Part of the Neuropsychology and Cognition book series (NPCO, volume 15)

Abstract

Do the developmental dyslexics form a homogeneous population, with a unique underlying impairment, or do they form distinct subgroups, thus opening up the possibility for different sources of impairment? In this chapter we compare different methods to subgroup dyslexic children and discuss the methodological implications.

Keywords

Reading Comprehension Poor Reader Developmental Dyslexia Reading Task Dyslexic Child 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nathalie Genard
  • Philippe Mousty
  • Alain Content
  • Jesus Alegria
  • Jacqueline Leybaert
  • José Morais

There are no affiliations available

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