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The Thermodynamic Arrow of Time in Quantum Cosmology

  • Katinka Ridderbos
Chapter
Part of the Synthese Library book series (SYLI, volume 320)

Abstract

It is an observational fact that the arrow defined by the increase of thermodynamic entropy points in the same direction as the arrow defined by the expansion of the universe. However, the status of this relation is a highly debated issue. Famously, Gold (1958, 1962) argued that, far from being a contingent fact, the relation is a causal one: the thermodynamic entropy increases as a result of the expansion of the universe, whereas in a collapsing universe the entropy necessarily decreases.

Keywords

Wave Packet Classical Trajectory Quantum Cosmology Perturbation Mode Path Integral Approach 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Katinka Ridderbos
    • 1
  1. 1.University of CambridgeUK

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