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Appendices

  • T. N. Irvine
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (ASIC, volume 196)

Abstract

This glossary presents definitions for the terms that are most commonly used in the description of layered igneous rocks, and where necessary, examples are cited. The definitions are taken largely from a review by Irvine (1982), but they strongly reflect original treatments by Wager, Brown and Wadsworth (1960), Wager and Brown (1968), and Jackson (1967,1970), and later comments by Wadsworth (1985). A point to remember in applying the terms is that the difference between “layers” and “layering” is essentially a difference between individuals and a population; thus the words that describe one may not be appropriate to the description of the other. For examples, words such as “intermittent”, “graded”, and “isomodal” rigorously apply only to layers, whereas “rhythmic” and “modal” should be only applied to layering.

Keywords

Layered Intrusion Bushveld Complex Econ Geol Cyclic Unit Crystallization Differentiation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. N. Irvine
    • 1
  1. 1.Geophysical LaboratoryCarnegie Institution of WashingtonUSA

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