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Characterisation of the Blast Pathogen Populations at Rice Screening Sites in West Africa

  • J. Chipili
  • S. Sreenivasaprasad
  • A. E. Brown
  • N. J. Talbot
  • M. Holderness
  • Y. Sere
  • S. K. Nutsugah
  • J. Twumasi
  • K. Dartey
Chapter
  • 378 Downloads

Abstract

In West Africa, the demand for rice is growing faster than any other major staple food. Rice constitutes a major source of calories for the rural and urban poor and is grown in approximately 4.3 million ha in 17 West African countries — member states of West Africa Rice Development Association (WARDA). Annual production in the region is approximately 7.4 million tonnes of paddy. FAO estimates for current annual rice imports in West Africa is 4 million tonnes, equivalent to more than one billion US$. The average yield is 1.7 tonnes per ha, lowest compared to the rest of the world and a wide range of biophysical constraints reduces the yield potential of the varieties (WARDA Annual Report, 1998; WARDA MTP, 200–2002).

Keywords

Rice Cultivar Wild Rice Rice Blast Blast Resistance International Rice Research Institute 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Chipili
    • 1
  • S. Sreenivasaprasad
    • 1
  • A. E. Brown
    • 1
  • N. J. Talbot
    • 2
  • M. Holderness
    • 3
  • Y. Sere
    • 4
  • S. K. Nutsugah
    • 5
  • J. Twumasi
    • 6
  • K. Dartey
    • 6
  1. 1.Horticulture Research InternationalWellesbourneUK
  2. 2.University of ExeterExeterUK
  3. 3.CABI BioscienceInternational Mycological InstituteUK
  4. 4.West Africa Rice Development AssociationBouakéCôte d’Ivoire
  5. 5.Savanna Agricultural Research InstituteGhana
  6. 6.Crops Research InstituteGhana

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