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World-Systems, Frontiers, and Ethnogenesis

Incorporation and Resistance to State Expansion
  • Thomas D. Hall
Chapter
Part of the Social Indicators Research Series book series (SINS, volume 9)

Abstract

The expansion of the European world-system necessarily entailed incorporation of new areas and peoples. In the process it created borderlines, boundaries zones, or frontiers between its various components and the external world. World-system analysis, which was developed to explain the dynamic expansion of the European based modern world-system, has paid insufficient attention to how local forces and actors shape the process. In particular, the study of the roles of gender, race, ethnicity, and interactions with nonstate peoples have been somewhat neglected (K. Ward 1993; Hall 1989a, 1989b, 1996a, 1996b).

Keywords

World System American Indian Woman Native American Group Marginal Periphery American Indian Culture 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2002

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  • Thomas D. Hall

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