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On Plasticity and Damage Evolution During Sheet Metal Forming

  • Christophe Husson
  • Christophe Poizat
  • Nadia Bahlouli
  • Saïd Ahzi
  • Thierry Courtin
  • Laurent Merle
Part of the Solid Mechanics and Its Applications book series (SMIA, volume 114)

Abstract

Based on experimental considerations, the proposed damage law considers that the growth of micro-voids results in a non-linear damage accumulation with plastic deformation. This paper presents a non-linear Continuum Damage Mechanics (C.D.M.) model for the prediction of ductile plastic damage analysis under large deformations such as in the case of metal forming. The dependence of the damage on temperature, strain rate and microstructure are discussed.

Keywords

ductile damage plasticity C.D.M. metal forming 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christophe Husson
    • 1
    • 3
  • Christophe Poizat
    • 2
  • Nadia Bahlouli
    • 1
  • Saïd Ahzi
    • 1
  • Thierry Courtin
    • 3
  • Laurent Merle
    • 3
  1. 1.IMFS - UMR 7507/CNRSUniversity Louis PasteurStrasbourgFrance
  2. 2.Fraunhofer IWMFreiburg i. Br.Germany
  3. 3.Corporate Research CenterFCILa Ferté-BernardFrance

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