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A Behavioral Model to Optimize Financial Quality of Life

  • Esther M. Maddux
Chapter
  • 121 Downloads
Part of the Social Indicators Research Series book series (SINS, volume 17)

Abstract

The purpose is to present a behavioral model to enable individuals to change self-defeating behavior patterns to reduce financial stress and optimize financial quality of life. Strategies for reducing financial stress include identifying and naming the source of financial stress as well as identifying behavioral and financial strategies to reshape behavior to create an optimal quality of life. The paper discusses how behavior patterns are learned, how emotional distortions evolve, and how emotional distortions can be dissolved.

Keywords

Behavior Pattern Consumer Research Financial Stress Financial Quality Compulsive Behavior 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Esther M. Maddux
    • 1
  1. 1.Maddux Financial ServicesAthensGreece

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