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The Method of Casuistry

  • Alexander Nikolaevich Shytov
Part of the Law and Philosophy Library book series (LAPS, volume 54)

Abstract

Conscience in making judicial decisions is a particularly complicated phenomenon which requires a special approach. Throughout the centuries moral philosophers and theologians have developed a discipline which deals with description and resolution of cases of conscience, that of casuistry. “The term ‘casuistry’ is derived from casus, Latin for ‘case’ and refers to the study of individual ‘cases of conscience’ in which more than one settled moral principle (or perhaps none) applies. More broadly, casuistry is the use of the ‘method of cases’ in the attempt to bring ethical reflection to bear on problems requiring the decision and action of some moral agent.”1

Keywords

Moral Agent Legal Rule Moral Duty Moral Rule Judicial Decision 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alexander Nikolaevich Shytov
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of LawStavropol State UniversityStavropolRussia
  2. 2.Commercial Law and EthicsMae Jo UniversityChiang MaiThailand

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