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Sympathy Judgements and the Declaratory Power of the High Court of Justiciary

  • Alexander Nikolaevich Shytov
Chapter
Part of the Law and Philosophy Library book series (LAPS, volume 54)

Abstract

This chapter will deal with the operation of sympathy judgements in cases of exercising broad judicial discretion. The criminal cases of Scottish High Court of Justiciary are taken as examples of how sympathy judgements are passed when the judges are faced with the shortcomings of formal law to protect the interests of individuals or society in general. The exercise of the declaratory power by the High Court of Justiciary is interesting as an example of where discretionary power can result in the aggravation of legal consequences for the individual compared with the formal law established previously,1 and what is more interesting, that this aggravation takes place in criminal law in which the requirement of non-retroactivity is one of the most important and universally recognised principles of law.2

Keywords

Criminal Offence Criminal Case Legal Reason Public Prosecution Judicial Activism 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alexander Nikolaevich Shytov
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of LawStavropol State UniversityStavropolRussia
  2. 2.Commercial Law and EthicsMae Jo UniversityChiang MaiThailand

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