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Paper Tools and Molecular Architecture in the Chemistry of Linus Pauling

  • Mary Jo Nye
Chapter
Part of the Boston Studies in the Philosophy and History of Science book series (BSPS, volume 222)

Abstract

In 1954 Linus Carl Pauling was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry “for his research into the nature of the chemical bond and its application to the elucidation of the structure of complex substances.” At the time of the Nobel award, Pauling’s book on The Nature of the Chemical Bond was widely recognized as the classic statement of the application of quantum mechanics to an explanation of chemical bonding. Yet, ironically, Pauling’s valence bond and atomic orbital approach in quantum chemistry, which he had first developed in the early 1930s, was just beginning in 1954 to lose ground to the molecular orbital method, which Robert Mulliken had long been developing as a rival system of explanation in quantum chemistry.

Keywords

General Chemistry Quantum Chemistry American Chemical Society Rockefeller Foundation Fuzzy Sphere 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mary Jo Nye
    • 1
  1. 1.Oregon State UniversityUSA

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