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Introduction

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Part of the Library of Public Policy and Public Administration book series (LPPP, volume 1)

Abstract

Research and development (R&D) activities are core economic functions of all industrial societies. For countries that have chosen to pursue a science and technology based competitiveness approach, R&D efforts are of key importance to national economic prosperity. The three countries that are the subject of this book — the United States, the United Kingdom, and Japan — have each adopted a science and technology based strategy. This shared commitment results in similar R&D policy concerns within each of the nations. One that carries considerable weight is university-industry collaborative R&D.

Keywords

Technology Transfer Industrial Policy Policy Mechanism Limited Partnership Private Sector Company 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Cleveland State UniversityClevelandUSA
  2. 2.National Institute of Economic and Social ResearchLondonUK
  3. 3.Georgia Institute of TechnologyAtlantaUSA

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