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Feeding of pneumatic conveying systems

  • G. E. Klinzing
  • R. D. Marcus
  • F. Rizk
  • L. S. Leung
Part of the Powder Technology Series book series (POTS, volume 8)

Abstract

Essential to the effective operation of a pneumatic conveying system is the efficient feeding of the solids into the pipeline. Feeding devices perform a variety of functions, including a sealing function, in which the conveying gas is essentially sealed from a storage hopper holding the product to be conveyed. Further, these devices might be required to accurately control the solids feed rate into the pipeline for process control features as in chemical plants or in dosing operations.

Keywords

Discharge Valve Rotary Valve Sonic Nozzle Mass Flow Ratio Feeding Device 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© G.E. Klinzing, R.D. Marcus and F. Rizk 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. E. Klinzing
    • 1
  • R. D. Marcus
    • 2
    • 3
  • F. Rizk
    • 4
  • L. S. Leung
    • 5
  1. 1.Chemical EngineeringUniversity of PittsburghUSA
  2. 2.Morgan Education Technologies (Pty) LtdSouth Africa
  3. 3.Key Centre for Bulk Solids and Particulate TechnologiesUniversity of NewcastleAustralia
  4. 4.Technical Research and Development DepartmentBASF-AktiengesellschaftLudwigshafenGermany
  5. 5.Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research OrganizationAustralia

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