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Erotetic Arguments

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Part of the Synthese Library book series (SYLI, volume 252)

Abstract

As was pointed out in Chapter 1, we often arrive at a question on the basis of some previously accepted declarative sentence or sentences. We also often arrive at a question when we are looking for the answer to another question on the basis of some data expressed by certain previously accepted declarative sentences or sentence. And sometimes we arrive at a question just when we are looking for the answer to another question. Some examples were presented in Chapter 1, Section 1.1; here are others:
  1. (1.a)

    John writes three books during one year. But if John writes three books during one year, then he is a monk or a bachelor or he has a very patient wife. So is John a monk, or a bachelor, or has he a very patient wife?

     
  2. (1.b)

    Is John a monk, or a bachelor, or has he a very patient wife? Well, if John is a monk or a bachelor or has a very patient wife, then he is single or married. But if John is single, then he is a monk or a bachelor. On the other hand, if John is married, then he has a very patient wife. So is John married or single?

     
  3. (1.c)

    Does John write a lot and does he read a lot? So does John write a lot?

     

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References

  1. 1.
    If this condition is not fulfilled, in what follows we should speak about universal closures of the above d-wffs.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Otherwise no erotetic argument is needed.Google Scholar
  3. 6.
    Cf. Chapter 5, Section 5.2.3.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Adam Mickiewicz UniversityPoznańPoland

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