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Ricoeur’s Attempted Rapprochement between Phenomenology and Hermeneutics

  • Burt C. Hopkins
Chapter
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Part of the Contributions to Phenomenology book series (CTPH, volume 11)

Abstract

In the attempt to situate the results of the present study in terms of the first variation of the second trend noted above, Ricoeur’s provocative attempt to mediate a dialectic rapprochement between phenomenology and hermeneutics will be considered. Ricoeur’s argument is based on the thesis, that beyond “the simple opposition there exists, between phenomenology and hermeneutics, a mutual belonging.”1 The simple opposition that Ricoeur refers to concerns the hermeneutical critique of Husserl’s phenomenological idealism. Ricoeur distinguishes the latter critique, from the phenomenological concern per se with the “question of meaning,”2 and holds that this “phenomenology remains the unsurpassable presupposition of hermeneutic...[while again, this] phenomenology cannot constitute itself without a hermeneutical presupposition.”3

Keywords

Phenomenological Reduction Logical Ideal Husserlian Phenomenology Transcendental Subjectivity Phenomenological Reflection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 1.
    Ricoeur, “Phenomenology and Hermeneutics,” op. cit.,p. 101.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Ibid., p. 114.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Ibid., p. 101.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Ibid., p. 105.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
  6. 6.
    See § 18ff. above.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Ricoeur, “Phenomenology and Hermeneutics,” op. cit., p. 115.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Ibid., p. 104.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
  10. 10.
    Ibid., p. 112.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    See § 9 and § 11 above.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    See §§ 10-11 above.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Ricoeur, “Phenomenology and Hermeneutics,” op. cit., p. 104.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    See §§ 22-23 above.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    See § 28 above.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Ricoeur, “Phenomenology and Hermeneutics,” op. cit., p. 103.Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    See §§ 33, 92, 97 above.Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    See § 33 above.Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Ricoeur, “Phenomenology and Hermeneutics,” op. cit., p. 103.Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Ibid., p. 109.Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    See §§ 7, 87, 101 above.Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Ibid., p. 106.Google Scholar
  23. 23.
  24. 24.
  25. 25.
    Ibid., p. 107.Google Scholar
  26. 26.
  27. 27.
    Ibid., p. 114.Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    Gadamer, “The Phenomenological Movement,” op. cit., p. 168.Google Scholar
  29. 29.
  30. 30.
    See §§ 45, 70,105-106 above.Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    See §§ 45, 67-70 above.Google Scholar
  32. 32.
    Ricoeur, “Phenomenology and Hermeneutics,” op. cit., p. 126.Google Scholar
  33. 33.
  34. 34.
    Mohanty, Transcendental Phenomenology: An Analytic Account, ( Oxford and Cambridge: Basil Blackwell, 1989 ), p. 21.Google Scholar
  35. 35.
  36. 36.
    Ibid., p. 104.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Burt C. Hopkins
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhilosophySeattle UniversityUSA

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