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Abstract

Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis has proved to be an extremely powerful tool for the analysis of complex mixtures of proteins (see Chapter 2). However, while the resolving power of this method has progressively increased (the two-dimensional gel system of O’Farrell1 for example being capable of resolving more than 1600 different proteins) any further analysis of the separated proteins has been limited. The majority of the protein molecules lie buried within the gel matrix and are therefore not readily accessible to further investigation. Though methods have been developed to overcome this problem (for example by elution of the proteins2 or by direct in-situ analysis using antisera3,4 or other protein probes5) these methods are in general time-consuming, insensitive and also frequently lead to a loss of resolution.

Keywords

Sodium Dodecyl Sulphate Sodium Dodecyl Sulphate Active Transfer Nitrocellulose Filter Cyanogen Bromide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Further Reading

  1. Schleicher and Schuell Inc., USA. Methods for the transfer of DNA, RNA and protein to nitrocellulose and diazotized paper solid supports. By: Barinaga. M. et al., 1981.Google Scholar
  2. Bio-Rad Laboratories.’ southern, Western and Electroblotting’, Bulletin 1080 EG, (June 1981).Google Scholar

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Copyright information

© John M. Walker and Wim Gaastra 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Keith Gooderham

There are no affiliations available

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